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Seven Tips to Make Spring Closet Decluttering Work

Health & Wellness Stories - Curvicality magazine
You know you have a cute little red dress somewhere, and it would be absolutely perfect for the occasion. It’s … somewhere. You try to shove the yellow sundress and the black pair of pants that are two sizes too small out of the way. No, you don’t want the green sweatshirt. No, not the polka-dotted jumpsuit. Somewhere in this &*$ing closet, there is a red dress! But where?

Maybe it’s time to re-organize your closet.

This spring, why not resolve to get that closet decluttered once and for all? Wouldn’t it be nice to be able to go through your closet and know that everything in it fits well and is appropriate to the season? You can be there in a couple of hours. All it takes is a little patience and an afternoon of hard work and dedication.

Celebrate spring in Curvicality style and declutter your closet with these seven tips. 

  1. Take an afternoon to do the hard work.

Take everything out of your closet. Yes, everything! Set aside a free afternoon, pump up some tunes, grab a latte and get ready to focus. 

Put every item on the bed. You’re going to think about each item individually. Create four piles: Keep, Toss, Donate or Sell, and Maybe. 

As you look at each item, ask the hard questions. Do I need this? Is there a reason I’m hanging onto it? Will I really wear it? And, perhaps most important of all, does it fit?

If you’re really going to wear it, put it in the “keep” pile. If you’re not sure, make it a “maybe.” If you’re going to donate or sell, put it there. If it doesn’t fit, send it packing.  

  1. Save closet space by storing off-season clothes in boxes.

You may think it’s enough just to separate your closet by season, but unless you have a huge walk-in closet, it takes up precious space you need for the current season. Instead, rotate out your closet as the weather changes.

You’ve got a few options here. You can get under-bed storage boxes or bags (like these AmazonBasics Fabric Under Bed Storage Bag Organizers with Handles). Or, you can resolve to store your clothes in boxes and stack them in a basement or attic. Just make sure they’re properly sealed. 

  1. Get rid of clothes that don’t fit.

If something doesn’t fit, get rid of it. Not only will this free up space for new, adorable finds, it’ll help you to push past negative thoughts that frustrate you when you see those items. 

  1. Swear by the one-year rule.

If you haven’t worn it in more than a year, get rid of it. You don’t need it, and you won’t miss it. After all, you haven’t worn it anyway! Don’t let emotion create closet clutter. 

  1. Take the tax deduction and donate.

If selling is your jam, list the big things and donate the rest. Think about it like this: Are you really going to get much for that ratty old T? Not unless it’s a collector’s item. Head over to your favorite not-for-profit and take the tax deduction. 

  1. Think about what you need next.

Now that you’ve taken a good look at what you own, you might see some patterns. Maybe you have five pairs of black work pants but no other colors. Or, maybe you have three of the exact same T. 

Think about what you don’t have. Do you need another dress for Sunday funday? Do you need a new pair of pink capris for casual Fridays? Make note of this so you can do your future shopping with  purpose. 

  1. Finish your project immediately.

Too many people start to declutter their closets and make a big mistake: They never finish the project. The clothes either end up back in the same place again, or they stay in messy piles. 

Don’t be that person. Donate or sell your unwanted items immediately (as in the same day you organize your closet). Store last season’s clothes right away. Finish what you started. You’ll feel much better in the long run.

 

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Ashley Manning is a self-proclaimed plus-sized outdoorswoman. From hiking the Appalachian trail to working as a white water river rafting guide, she prefers being outdoors above all else, and she loves changing the perspective of those around her while doing it.